Serving professional journalism since 1912

Magazine of the Chartered Institute of Journalists

Autumn 2016

  • Brexit referendum: an apology to Andrew Marr

    Letter to the editor Dear Editor, When I wrote about Andrew Marr’s novel Head of State in the last issue of The Journal, it was to tot up what he had got right and what wrong in his fictional account of a referendum on British membership of the European Union. I was perhaps a bit…

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  • Rory Peck Trust appoints new Head of Programmes

    Mary O’Shea is joining the Rory Peck Trust as the Trust’s new Head of Programmes. O’Shea is a programme specialist with over 12 years international experience. She brings to the role extensive field experience, having worked on a freelance basis in countries including Sudan, Jordan, Tunisia, Sri Lanka, Lebanon, South Sudan, Maldives, Bangladesh, Togo, Ethiopia,…

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  • Conference season

    This Autumn the Chartered Institute of Journalists heads to the south west for its annual conference. The historic county of Dorset is a glorious location for our main gathering of the year. I am surprised it has taken us so long to escape from London. In fact we haven’t ventured to the seaside for an…

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  • New BBC Charter – has anything really changed?

    The Government has announced a new draft Royal Charter for the BBC covering the next 11 years and aimed at ensuring that “a strong, distinctive, independent BBC will continue to thrive for years to come.” Using much of the flowery language of the previous Charter, the arguments on the day of the announcement focused on…

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  • Journalist makes legal history

    Legal history has been made in Edinburgh with The Investigatory Powers Tribunal awarding substantial damages to a Scotish investigative journalist after Police Scotland had unlawfully obtained his phone records to discover the identity of his sources. The award of £10,000 to former police officer, Gerard Gallacher, is the first time any British court/tribunal has compensated…

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  • Warning over privatisation

    The CIoJ has called on the Government to ensure that privatisation of state agencies does not result in restrictions to journalists’ access to digital databases.There were fears that privatisation of the Land Registry could limit the ability of investigative journalists to seek information about corruption, special interests and questionable financial arrangements. It has been reported…

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  • Seeing double

    The potential farce of double press regulation is looming as the Royal Charter’s Press Recognition Panel moves closer to approving IMPRESS, a rival to the main industry backed regulator IPSO. IMPRESS recognition would mean that publishers not agreeing to Royal Charter-approved policing of their editorial standards could face penalties in media law disputes. Sections 34…

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  • Restore ECHR to protect Turkey’s journalists, says Institute

    The Chartered Institute of Journalists has urged the Turkish government to restore the application of the European Convention of Human Rights and protect the position of the country’s journalists and media workers. In the wake of the failed military coup against President Erdogan, the CIoJ argues that respect for essential human rights such as freedom…

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  • Senior police officers call for more secrecy

    In a move widely condemned as hypocritical by journalists and by victims of false accusations, the Chief Constables’ Council is demanding that official complaints about the conduct and behaviour of senior police officers should be kept secret. A report by journalists at The Mail on Sunday has revealed that at a meeting between the Chief…

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  • Unfair contracts – evidence needed

    Have you ever been presented with a contract transferring all your rights, for the entire universe, for ever, by all publishing means including those not yet invented, then told “Sign this, or else!”? If you are a freelance journalist, or indeed any other kind of self-employed creator of intellectual property, the likely answer is ‘Yes’.…

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