Serving professional journalism since 1912

Magazine of the Chartered Institute of Journalists

  • Broadcasting Britain- 100 years of the BBC

    Broadcasting Britain- 100 years of the BBC

    The Chartered Institute of Journalists has never been in any doubt about the importance and significance of the BBC and its history. We are the oldest established professional association of journalists in the world and we were first established in 1884. 38 years later in 1922 one of our Fellows, Arthur Burrows, was the BBC’s…

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  • The BBC’s first journalist and newscaster was a fellow of the Chartered Institute of Journalists

    Arthur Richard Burrows was British broadcasting’s multiple pioneer. He was the first journalist to be employed by the nascent British Broadcast Company in 1922, its first director of programmes for its first London radio station 2LO, the first person to compile and present a news bulletin for the BBC, The BBC’s first ‘Radio Uncle’ for…

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  • The suppression of journalism freedom in Myanmar

    It is no exaggeration to say the destruction of human freedoms in Myanmar following the military coup of 2021 means innocent and good people repeatedly hear the bang on their door at three o’clock in the morning and find themselves arbitrarily dragged into a nightmare of imprisonment, humiliation and inhuman treatment. This has been the…

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  • Chartered Institute of Journalists’ Submission to the UK Ministry of Justice’s consultation on Human Rights Act Reform: A Modern Bill Of Rights- to reform the Human Rights Act 1998

    The Chartered Institute of Journalists is the world’s longest established professional association for journalists and only such body with a Royal Charter. We represent staff and freelance journalists across all sectors of the media, including local and national newspapers, periodicals, broadcasting and electronic publishing. The Institute prides itself in being non-party political and expresses opinions…

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  • News and How To Use It by Alan Rusbridger

    This book is described as an A-Z guide on how ‘to stay informed in the era of fake news’ and has been written by the Guardian’s former Editor-in-Chief who currently edits Prospect Magazine. Alan Rusbridger held the Guardian editor’s tiller for twenty years between 1995 and 2015. He is something of a polymath. Between the…

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  • Growing Out in the Swinging Sixties by Barbara Blake Hannah

    Barbara Blake Hannah was Britain’s first black woman television news reporter on Thames Television in the 1960s. She was harassed and thwarted by racism. She decided to leave Britain to return to her native Jamaica to enjoy a more congenial career in promoting the island’s film industry. In Jamaica for the fifty years that followed…

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  • The BBC: A People’s History

    This unique 638 page ‘authorised’ history of the BBC by Professor David Hendy succeeds in being readable, scholarly, interesting and entertaining. The last time an official history was researched and written was by another Professor at Sussex University, Lord Asa Briggs. That needed five volumes, took 35 years, and comprises nearly 4,000 pages. Volume V…

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  • ‘Legend in his own lifetime’ journalist James Bayes and – Institute history from 1931

    This remarkable image is a snapshot from the history of journalism in Britain that has remained largely unknown to the general public for 91 years. This was the hall in Tudor Street, the City of London, about a minute or two’s walking distance from Fleet Street that was the headquarters of the Chartered Institute of…

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  • Journalists’ Sources- battles in London and Strasbourg

    He is 74 years old, a former government minister and Labour MP, and is now being challenged by the West Midlands Police force to reveal source information into a journalistic investigation he carried out nearly 40 years ago. It seems to be a bizarre scenario; particularly when the confidential source or sources who spoke to…

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  • Anonymising the suspect- The UK Supreme Court delivers blow to press freedom

    The unanimous decision by the UK Supreme Court on 15th February 2022 in Bloomberg v ZXC to give powerful legal authority to the right of criminal suspects before charge in the UK to remain anonymous is not only a terrible blow to media freedom. By over-protecting individuals being investigated by any state agency with ‘the…

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